Pinkcity Jaipur Rajasthan


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JAIPURRAJASTHANSHOPPINGFAIR & FESTIVALUSEFUL INFODIL COOL WORLD
Shopping
Jewelry
Paintings
Miniature Art
Phads & Pichwais
Folk Painting
Leatherwear
Stone Carving
Metal Craft
Textile
Blue pottery
Terracota
Dhurries And Carpets
Wooden Artefacts 

|Jewellery | Paintings | Miniature Art | Phads & Pichwais | Folk Painting | Leatherwear | Stone Carving | Metal Craft | Textile | Blue pottery | Terracota | Dhurries And Carpets | Wooden Artefacts

Miniature Art

Miniature Art This is the most visible and widely prevalent type of painting, colourful pictures painted in glowing mineral and vegetable colours on hand-made papers.

The miniature painter did not lack patronage. Seven styles in different kingdoms developed rapidly (the technique was similar to wall paintings, cloth and manuscripts illustrations) used initially manuscripts for text illustrations, they gradually evolved as portfolios of the life and times of their Royal patrons.

The miniature tradition goes back at least to the 11th century. Later the Mughal influence though their style was of Mughal court style, yet the painters by the 17th century settled for traditional idioms and regional elements. And the modern miniature painting speaks of those age-old traditions of Rajasthan.

Phads & Pichwais

The ancient tradition of scroll painting survives in Rajasthan as Phad. A typical Phad is a long rectangular coarse cloth with paintings illustrating the life and heroic exploits of the two popular folks heroes Pabuji and Dev Narain. It displays much of the tradition in narrative form. Painted by the Joshis of Shahpura, near Bhilwara based on subjects like Bhagavad purana or other popular folk stories.

The Pichwais are refined works of art, created to be used as backdrops in the Srinathji at Nathdwara. They contain the figure of Srinathji (attired with a variety of costumes) and scenes of Nathdwara festival. These could be painted, printed with hand blocks, woven, embroidered or decorated in appliqué form.